Maine

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woodbrey_ben_bdn_lobsteringMaine has long held a fascination for out-of-state writers and artists, who have evoked the state’s pristine forests and rocky coastline in stories and paintings. But what is it like to grow up here? The Bangor Daily News recently showcased a series of “digital postcards” created for a New Media class taught by Still Water Co-Director Joline Blais.

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Maine Song and Story SamplerA collaboration between a class taught by Still Water Co-Director Joline Blais and the Maine Folklife Center has resulted in a user-friendly way to survey the state’s rich heritage in story and song. The result shows how digital curation can make history and culture more accessible to a wide audience.

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Colby Museum RenderingWhen it reopens on July 13 after a major renovation, the Colby College Museum will become the largest art museum in Maine. Front and center for the opening will be the Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion, a monumental space that calls out for innovative programming.

Colby’s Sharon Corwin and Patricia King invited Still Water to brainstorm with their staff about how to make the white cube a destination for today’s media-savvy creators.

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Political SignsMaine Public Radio’s Jennifer Mitchell interviews Jon Ippolito about the proliferation of colors in advertisements for this season’s political candidates, and what subliminal messages these new palettes might contain.

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As the final speaker in the panel discussion “Re-Imagining Globalism: Maine in the World’s Economy” at Bates College on Jan. 25, 2008, Peter Riggs, Executive Director of the Forum on Democracy and Trade, concluded his talk on climate change and international relations with a call for a new kind of creativity:

“Probably the most exciting part of looking ahead to what is a climate-constrained world, is the opportunity of new art forms to emerge. If cinema was the artform of the twentieth century, I submit to you that the artform of the twenty-first century is going to be–and it’s performance art by the way–restoration ecology.”

The talk was featured in Maine Public Radio’s “Speaking in Maine” series; mp3 and podcast available.

For reference, here’s a longer transcription of Riggs concluding remarks.

“Finally, since we are in a liberal arts school, I think probably the most exciting part of looking ahead to what is a climate-constrained world, is the opportunity of new art forms to emerge. If cinema was the art form of the twentieth century, I submit to you that the art form of the twenty-first century is going to be–and it’s performance art by the way–restoration ecology. Because we’re going to get really good at understanding how to rebuild ecosystems on their timescale and their timeframes, and that interrogative process of what ecosystems need to flourish, particularly in a time of atmospheric change, will teach us a lot. And I personally look forward to more engagement on the art and science of restoration ecology, because I really think that’s the future.”

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