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Digital Curation at the University of Maine

Good news for out-of-state and international students interested in the University of Maine’s online Digital Curation graduate program.

The University has extended its long-distance discount to students who enroll in the Certificate by this spring.

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Education Advisory Board (EAB) logoThe University of Maine’s online program in digital curation has been growing quickly, with applications to the graduate certificate tripling over the past two years. It’s good timing, because US employer demand for digital curation professionals grew 60% from 2010 to 2013. That’s according to a report just out from the Education Advisory Board, which features the University of Maine as one of the only institutions in the world offering such a program.

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The Pirate BayBy now university administrators and IT departments are accustomed to passing on letters from the music industry accusing students of sharing music illegally over the Internet. What’s surprising about the latest round of letters from the RIAA is that they offer to settle piracy charges with students for only $10 or $20, despite recent high-profile court cases awarding exorbitant sums for individual violations.

Still water co-director Jon Ippolito explains this shift in tactics in an interview with MPBN’s Jennifer Mitchell.

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Commons Locked Book IconMaine Public Radio highlights the debate over open access to scholarly publications in conversation with Still Water’s Jon Ippolito and his fellow colleagues from the University of Maine.

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Still Water’s co-directors are in the news this month in articles about an online song-and-story sampler and crowdfunding for indie movie projects.

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As the final speaker in the panel discussion “Re-Imagining Globalism: Maine in the World’s Economy” at Bates College on Jan. 25, 2008, Peter Riggs, Executive Director of the Forum on Democracy and Trade, concluded his talk on climate change and international relations with a call for a new kind of creativity:

“Probably the most exciting part of looking ahead to what is a climate-constrained world, is the opportunity of new art forms to emerge. If cinema was the artform of the twentieth century, I submit to you that the artform of the twenty-first century is going to be–and it’s performance art by the way–restoration ecology.”

The talk was featured in Maine Public Radio’s “Speaking in Maine” series; mp3 and podcast available.

For reference, here’s a longer transcription of Riggs concluding remarks.

“Finally, since we are in a liberal arts school, I think probably the most exciting part of looking ahead to what is a climate-constrained world, is the opportunity of new art forms to emerge. If cinema was the art form of the twentieth century, I submit to you that the art form of the twenty-first century is going to be–and it’s performance art by the way–restoration ecology. Because we’re going to get really good at understanding how to rebuild ecosystems on their timescale and their timeframes, and that interrogative process of what ecosystems need to flourish, particularly in a time of atmospheric change, will teach us a lot. And I personally look forward to more engagement on the art and science of restoration ecology, because I really think that’s the future.”

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